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Marbles (and similar games ) View Visualisation

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Beetles Search Source: SND (supp)
With def. art.: the name of a game like miniature skittles.

Blind smashie Search Source: SND
Smashie: a game of marbles in which a heavy marble is thrown with force at smaller marbles placed either in a hole in the ground or along the base of a wall. Blind smashie, a similar game played with birds' eggs.

Bobs Search Source: SND
A game of marbles.

Bool Search Sources: SND SND (supp)
Extended to mean the game.

Boolholes Search Source: SND
A game of marbles.

Bouncing chippy Search Source: SND
A game of marbles.

Bowls Search Source: SND
A name commonly given to the game of taw, because played with small bowls made of marble.

Brook Search Source: SND
A game of marbles, in which a circle, square, or triangle with intersecting lines is drawn, and a marble placed at the end of each line and at the point of intersection. The object of the players is to knock the marbles out of the “brook” from a stance some ten or twelve feet away.

Bulkie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the marbles are placed in a line, and each player has two chances.

Bun Search Source: SND (supp)
QUOT: The people also are to repair the house effectually; to floor it anew, put bun-doors on it. Add: 3. Also used subst. as the name of a game of marbles.

Buttons Search Source: SND
A boys' game, somewhat similar to marbles, but played with buttons which had distinctive names and values.

Buttony/Buttonie Search Source: SND
Varieties of the above game.

Capey-dykey/Cappie-dykey Search Source: SND
A boys' game played with marbles, which were placed in a cap at the foot of a wall or “dyke”.

Cappy hole/Capie Search Source: SND (supp)
The hole game in marbles, also reduced to capie.

Chasie/Chaisie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles.

Chippie-holie Search Source: SND
A game at marbles where the marbles are thrown into a hole.

Chippy smash Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the row of marbles was placed about an inch from the base of a wall: fairly easy.

Chippy/Chippie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles.Also varieties of this game, all having in common the fact that “the marbles of the players were arranged in a straight line side by side, each player depositing the same number. Then from a certain distance each player threw a marble at the row and got as many as he was lucky or skilful enough to knock out of it.

Chucks Search Source: SND
A game with marbles played by girls.

Dab at the hole Search Source: SND
A game of marbles.

Dabbie/Dabback/Dubback Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the stakes are set in the angle at the foot of a wall.

Dabbie/Dobie/Dabbie-winnie Search Source: SND (supp)
A form of the game in which the stakes were appropriated by the winner.

Daigie/Deggie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles played by throwing a ‘pitcher' at marbles placed in a row against a wall so that the pitcher rebounds.

Derbs/Dirbs Search Source: SND
The game of marbles.

Doorie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles, played against a door.

Dorb Search Source: SND
A variety of the game of marbles in which the marbles are placed hard up against a wall. The pitcher is flung hard towards the wall and if it is caught on the rebound, the player gets another shot.

Drawchie Search Source: SND
A boys' game played by rolling marbles up and down a sloping water channel.

Dreep Search Source: SND
A game at marbles, in which each tries to hit and thereby win an opponent's marbles.

Dumps/Dumpie/Dumpy Search Source: SND
The game of marbles as played in dumps .

Duntie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles played against a wall, the winning marble being that which on the rebound strikes the first-played marble or lies nearest to it.

Funnie-winnie Search Source: SND
A game, usu. of marbles, where no score is kept and all winnings are restored to the loser at the end of play, the game being played for fun only and not in earnest.

Funny Search Source: SND
A game, usu. of marbles, where no score is kept and all winnings are restored to the loser at the end of play, the game being played for fun only and not in earnest.

Gibbery Search Source: SND
A variety of the game of marbles.

Ground chippy Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the row was placed in the open, not near a wall: more difficult.

Guissie-in-the-kirk Search Source: SND
A game in which one boy endeavours to roll a ball or large marble (the “guissie”) into a central hole (the “kirk”), despite his opponents' efforts to drive it back.

Guttery Search Source: SND
A variety of the game of marbles played along the street gutter.

Hard nickle doon Search Source: SND
A game of marbles.

Hashie-Bashie/Hashie-Holie Search Source: SND
A game played with marbles in which smaller marbles were knocked out of holes by striking them with a larger one.

Hole and taw Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the marbles were aimed at others in holes in the ground.

Holes/Holie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the marbles were aimed at others in holes in the ground.

Holey birnie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the marbles were aimed at others in holes in the ground.

Holie dumps Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the marbles were aimed at others in holes in the ground.

Holie for nags Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the marbles were aimed at others in holes in the ground.

Jacob's ladder Search Source: SND
A marbles game, played with five marbles over a pitch scored with parallel lines like the rungs of a ladder.

Keelie Search Sources: SND SND
A boys' game of marbles, “the object being to get the marble into three holes in a row. The player who did this could then smash with his marble those of his opponents he pleased”. A name for the three-holes game of marbles

Keeps/Keepie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the winnings are kept.

Knickle-ringie Search Source: SND
A variant of the marble game Ringie.

Knoup Search Source: SND
A game at marbles.

Knucklie-chasey Search Source: SND
A game in which two children propel marbles along a road, trying in turn to strike the other's marble.

Knucklie/Knuckl(e)y/Knuckely Search Source: SND
A game played with marbles.

Kype Search Source: DOST
A name for certain games of marbles or of ball, in which the marbles or the ball are aimed at a hole in the ground.

Kype Search Sources: SND SND (supp)
A game played with marbles aimed at a hole in the ground.

Kypie-holie Search Source: SND
A game played with marbles aimed at a hole in the ground.

Lab/Labbie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles.

Lampie Search Source: SND
A form of the game of marbles.

Langie-spangie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles, usually played with “muckle bools”, straight out, along a road, by children going to school, etc.

Lanta Search Source: SND
A game of marbles. QUOT:As he remembers the game, the “Lanta” was the starting line and was made about four or five feet from the Hog which was the circle where the marbles were placed at the beginning of the game.

Lashie Search Source: SND
A variety of marbles game.

Liney Search Source: SND
A score or straight mark on the ground in the game of marbles, in dim. form liney, a game played with this.

Marble and the girn Search Source: SND
A game of skill.

Marble-bools/Marble-bowls Search Source: SND
The children's game of marbles.

Mites Search Source: SND
The game itself.

Monkey-chip/Monkey-chippie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles. QUOT: Monkey Chip — A game at marbles: throw a marble against a wall so that it will rebound to a hole.

Moshie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles using three such hollows at regular intervals.

Mug/Muggie/Muggy Search Source: SND
The name of the game itself.

Nags Search Source: SND
A game played with marbles, in which the loser is struck a certain number of times on the knuckles by the marbles of the other players.

Nickle doon stiff's a poker Search Sources: SND SND
A game of marbles.

Nipen Ten Search Source: SND (supp)
The name of a marbles game.

Penty Search Source: SND
A game at marbles.

Pitcher/Pecher Search Source: SND
A game played in a ring with marbles.

Pitching-ring Search Source: SND
A game played in a ring with marbles.

Plunk/Plunkie Search Source: SND
The game of marbles so played.

Poodlin Search Source: SND
A variety of the game of marbles. QUOT: “Plunk”, which is known in Edinburgh as “Poodlin” and “Guttery”, resembles “Capie-Dykie”; but instead of throwing the bool at those on the line, it must be bowled like an underhand ball at cricket.

Pookie Search Source: SND
A variety of the game of marbles .

Punkies Search Source: DOST
A game of marbles played in three holes in the ground, the holes themselves.

Ring/Ringie/Ring(e)y Search Source: SND
The game itself.

Rookie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the winner takes all.

Roopie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the winner claimed the marbles of the losers.

Scout Search Source: SND
A game of marbles, played in three holes.

Shore/Shorie Search Source: SND
A variety of the game of marbles, with two forms big shorie and little or wee shorie, in which the space in which to play the marbles was more restricted.

Skoosh Search Source: SND
A variation of the game of marbles, in which 6 marbles were placed against a wall, and a chalk line drawn 3–4 yds. away, which the player might not cross. He then attempted to hit the marbles with a large marble, and, if successful, kept those he had hit, and had another throw. If he were unsuccessful, another player took his turn.

Smashie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which a heavy marble is thrown with force at smaller marbles placed either in a hole in the ground or along the base of a wall, the game of Daigie.

Smowt Search Source: SND
A term used in marbles, in pl. for a variety of the game in which the marble is thrown.

Snipie Search Source: SND
QUOT: Snipie: a marble game. A half-circle is drawn on the ground, with the straight side against a wall. Each player puts in a marble, touching the wall. They then stand about 6 feet back, and take turns to throw marbles at the sitting ones: if a marble is knocked out of the mark, the player gets it to keep, and if he can catch his own missile on the rebound he gets another shot.

Spangie-wangie Search Source: SND
A game played with marbles, half-pence or buttons, in which the player can claim his opponent's piece if he himself throws to within a span of it.

Spangie/Spawnie Search Source: SND
A game played with marbles, half-pence or buttons, in which the player can claim his opponent's piece if he himself throws to within a span of it.

Spout Search Source: SND
A game of marbles played with a hole in the ground.

Stakey Search Source: SND
A game at marbles, where stakes are laid; “three marbles are placed in the hole and aimed at with a larger marble. Failure to drive all or any out means an accumulation in the hole which goes to the ultimately successful player”.

Stannin dibbie Search Source: SND
A ring game of marbles in which the players have to fire into the centre while standing erect on the circumference.

Stappie Search Source: SND
A variety of the game of marbles, in which the player makes a step forward before shooting at his opponent's marbles.

Strandie/Strannie Search Source: SND
A game of marbles played by progression along a street gutter.

Stunk(s) Search Source: SND
The game itself.

Teeple Search Source: SND
The game of marbles in which one player tries to drive his opponent's marble forward for as long as he can.

Til the millie Search Source: SND
A variety of the game of marbles.

Wallie Search Source: SND
A marbles game in which each player rolls a marble towards a wall, and the owner of the one coming nearest has then the first shot at his opponents.

Win and loss Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the winner keeps his gains and does not return them to his opponent as in Funny.

Winnie/Winny/Wunny Search Source: SND
A game of marbles in which the winner keeps his gains and does not return them to his opponent as in Funny.

Winning ring Search Source: SND
A variety of marbles in which the stakes are placed inside a ring marked on the ground and those knocked out of it are appropriated by the victor.

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4 thoughts on “Marbles (and similar games )

  1. Desky

    Keps and backstoats: was a term used is Ayrshire to describe a penalty shot whereby your opponent had to stand with the heels of his feet together thereby creating a triangular barrier at the back of the hole making it almost impossible to miss.

  2. Jim Hunter

    In Stewarton, Ayrshire in the 1950’s there were several types of marbles and several games, all with names . Old people told us there had been more. The ones I remember are : “bool” – general term for marble, “bools” the general term for any game; “keepie” – the usual game where the winner took all; “plunkers” where you had to “plunk” your bool using your thumb and first finger.
    Types of marble were “jaurie” – an old earthenware marble, usually large size (I don’t think these were still made, but quite a few were still about); “glessie” – the normal shop-bought standard sized marble; “steelie” – a large ball bearing, usually a reject from the local engineering factory.

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