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Golf-course View Visualisation

Other parts of speech:

Golf-links Search Sources: SND SND (supp)
A golf course by the sea-shore.

Golfing course Search Source: SND
A golf course.

Golfing links Search Source: SND
A golf course.

Golfing-ground Search Source: SND
A golf course.

Link-ground Search Source: SND
The sandy undulating ground, gen. covered with turf, bent grass, gorse, etc., which is freq. found near the sea-shore on a flat part of the coast, and is often common ground belonging to the nearest town. Gen.Sc. Very common as a place-name associated with most sea-side burghs in Scot., e.g. Links of Leith, Kirkcaldy Links, Lundin Links, Links of Montrose, Dornoch Links, etc., but much less frequent on the west coast. Occas. applied to similar ground away from the sea, e.g. Bruntsfield Links in Edinburgh, long used as a golf-course.

Linkis/Lynkis Search Source: DOST
A links: a stretch of comparatively level or gently undulating open, sandy ground having turf, bentgrass or gorse growing on it, normally near the seashore and commonly including sand-dunes. Also rarely applied to a similar stretch of open ground not by the sea. Used for grazing, for maintaining rabbit-warrens, for musters and for sports, including golf.

Links Search Source: SND
The sandy undulating ground, gen. covered with turf, bent grass, gorse, etc., which is freq. found near the sea-shore on a flat part of the coast, and is often common ground belonging to the nearest town. Gen.Sc. Very common as a place-name associated with most sea-side burghs in Scot., e.g. Links of Leith, Kirkcaldy Links, Lundin Links, Links of Montrose, Dornoch Links, etc., but much less frequent on the west coast. Occas. applied to similar ground away from the sea, e.g. Bruntsfield Links in Edinburgh, long used as a golf-course.

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