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Curling (phrase) View Visualisation

A pair o' breeks Search Source: SND (supp)
A situation in which the played stones lie in a V-formation at the tee.

Big on to the bowercock Search Source: SND
To direct the stone to where a number are already laid.

Block the ice Search Source: SND
To block up with guards the run of the stones, so that none of them may take out a guarded winner.

Chap an' lie Search Source: SND
To strike away the opponent's stone and make your stone lie in its place.

Lead the ice Search Source: SND
The order given to the first player, when about to play; also to any player, when stones are in the direct way to the ‘tee'.

To be in the way of promotion Search Source: SND
To be in the path of another stone, to lie in the direct path to the tee.

To be naething the louder Search Source: SND
Used imper. as a direction to a player to attempt to hit and displace an opponent's stone without giving his own any extra force.

To block a port/To fill a port Search Source: SND
To enter a port.

To br(e)ak an egg/Brack an egg Search Sources: SND SND
QUOT: Brack an egg. A curling phrase, given by the directors of the game to those about to play; and means, that they are to strike a stone with their's, with that force that it would break an egg between them at the point of contact.

To brak (aff) the gaird/To brak (aff) a gaird Search Source: SND
To strike away a guarding stone.

To burn a stane Search Source: SND
To render the move useless, by the interference of one who has not the right to play at that time.

To chip the winner Search Source: SND
A curling term: to avoid the guard and take [strike] what can be seen of the winner [winning stone].

To crack an egg Search Sources: SND SND
A curling phrase, given by the directors of the game to those about to play; and means, that they are to strike a stone with their's, with that force that it would break an egg between them at the point of contact.

To fit fair Search Source: SND
To take up one's position for delivering the shot at the proper distance from the far tee.

To flee the gaird(s) Search Source: SND
To miss striking the guarding stone(s).

To get under grannie's wing Search Source: SND
To get under cover, i.e. to angle off a stone, so as to hide yourself behind another.

To gie (a stane) feet Search Source: SND
To accelerate its movement by sweeping the ice before it.

To gie a stane howe Search Source: SND
To send up a stone on a curving course.

To give 'im days Search Source: SND
To endeavour to keep the stone running.

To have a' the curle/To be a' the curle Search Source: SND
To have played the winning shot.

To have the very curl/ To be the very curl Search Source: SND
To have played the winning shot.

To keep white ice Search Source: SND
To throw one's stone up the middle of the rink and not to one side.

To lift up the gaird Search Source: SND
To strike away a guarding stone with a powerful shot.

To outside twist Search Source: SND
To cause a stone to revolve on its sole to the left.

To redd the hoose/ To redd the ice Search Source: SND
To clear the tee of stones lying on it by displacing them with a fast forceful shot.

To roup the stowp/To sell the stowp/The roup(in) o the stowp Search Source: SND
Of a mock auction procedure in the Curlers' “Court” or jollification after a curling match.

To tak' the claf Search Source: SND
To come between the two guards in curling.

To take an outring Search Source: SND
To deliver a shot in this manner (outring: a method of striking one curling stone with another on its outer edge so as to drive it towards the tee)

To want heels Search Source: SND
Of a stone in curling, to lack momentum or drive.

To wick a bore/To wick a post Search Source: SND
To carry out this manoeuvre through a narrow passage between already-played stones.

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